Free MP3 Album Download:Facedown Summer Sampler

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I want everybody to know that I have not been purposely posting samplers exclusively lately. I find this free music and I just put it out there as quickly as I can. This week we got some hard and heavy tracks form the Facedown Records family and Alt Press. 12 tracks of their finest and brightest, they even threw in a few unreleased songs to boot. Check the track listing below and then click through to download the album. You are welcome…..

1.For Today “Devastator”
2.My Epic “Lower Still”
3.War Of Ages “Collapse”
4.In The Midst Of Lions “The Machine”
5.A Hope For Home “The Overman”
6.Impending Doom “Orphans”
7.Call To Preserve “Empty”
8.A Plea For Purging “Shiver”
9.The Burial “Demons Never Sleep”
10.Onward To Olympas “Sink Of Swim”
11.As Hell Retreats “Poor God”
12.Wrench In The Works “Project AK-47″

Download the Facedown Records/Alt Press Summer Sampler

Cornerstone 2010 Schedule: Ian

So in about 3 weeks, The ONE21 is headed out to Cornerstone Festival 2010. There are hundreds of bands and performers sweating it out from around 11AM to close to 2 in the morning every day. It can be very overwhelming to to take in everything that Cornerstone has to offer, and the sad fact is that you are almost guaranteed to miss a lot.

Well, we are here to help!

With the help of a nifty new website called www.cstoneschedule.com, the four of us attending have been able to begin planning out our Cornerstone experience. Below, I am going to list a few highlights from every day of the festival. Hopefully this will help you plan your week out a little better if you are attending.

Check out my full schedule, and maybe come say hi. I will be the guy with the giant red beard and shaved head. Its kinda hard to miss me. I will have free stickers and buttons for ya!

MONDAY: typically a slow day, but there are a ton of generator shows going on, and you can get very up close and personal with the performers. Also be on the lookout for “surprise” shows. I saw Blindside play a show on the lawn back in 2003. Keep your eyes open!
Love Begotten 3:00PM- Raging Storm/Sancrosanct Stage: the band puts on a wild stage show and seemlessly blend it with a heavy dose of profound ministry.  They were also one of our “Voices Of the Underground”

A Hope For Home 7:30PM- Solace Stage: These guys are one of the more promising bands to come out of the post-hardcore/rock scene in the last few years. They were also one of our “Voices Of The Underground”.

Take It Back! 10:30PM- Solace Stage- This will be my first time seeing the posi-hardcore band that have been blasting through my speakers all year. If you want to see earnest punk/hardcore, you need to be at this show!

Tuesday: The unofficial 1st day of the fest. In past years, Tooth & Nail have run this particular day, but the economy has forced the label to step back. Once again, this may seem like a slow day, but there is still alot going on
Fire From The Gods/Let The Dead 12:00PM/12:45PM- Legacy Stage: These two bands are actually friends of mine from right here in Austin, Texas. Come a behold the next great Texas metal/hardcore superstars!

The Ember Days 9:00 PM- Solace Stage: I am really excited to get to experience the progressive worship of The Ember Days. The band recently relocated to the States from New Zealand, and are working on some new material which hopefully will make it into their set at Cornerstone. They were also one of our “Voices Of The Underground”

Flatfoot 56 10:00PM- Legacy Stage: While everybody else is at Switchfoot on the main stage, I will be getting a rowdy dose of celtic punk with the legendary Flatfoot 56. Once again, this will be the first time seeing these guys despite the fact that I have been a fan for a very long time!

Wednesday: This will be the first official day of Cornerstone Festival 2010, with all the seminars, Bible studies, and events beginning along with the music and the Main stage running all day. The festival gets kind of….crazy from here on out. This will be one of my longest days
So Long Forgotten 12:45- Solace Stage: I have heard that So Long Forgotten‘s live shows are nothing short of amazing, so this will be an amazing way to start my day off. The band’s latest album, The Things We Can See and The Things We Cannot was on our best of the year list from 2009.

Bradley Hathaway 3:15PM- Main Stage: If you dont see Mr. Hathaway at Cornerstone, you havent truely done Cornerstone right. Nuff said!  Bradley also had one of our best albums form 2009.

Levi The Poet 4:00PM-Solace Stage: Levi The Poet is a gifted spoken word artist who’s performances range from quiet recital to wild thrashings as he covers everything from the love of God, self doubt, and pornography addiction. Also, I will finally be able to pick up his CD!

Listener 6:00PM- Jesus Village: THIS IS ONE OF MY MUST SEES! I promise you that this will be one of the best live shows you have ever seen!

mewithoutYou 7:00PM- Main Stage: Once again, if you dont see mewithoutYou at Cornerstone Festival, you havent done Cornerstone right. Nuff said…..again.  Once again, the band’s latest CD was one of the best from 2009.

Sleeping Giant 10:50PM- Underground Stage: This “hardcore” band is known to create an atmosphere of worship that most churches miss by miles. People have given their lives to Christ, been healed, and rebuked demons at these guys shows. At clubs. This is Cornerstone! Of course there will be moshing too, but thats how Sleeping Giant does it! Did I forget to mention that this is a 2 hour show? Well, it is…..

The Chariot 12AM- Encore Stage: If you happen to leave Sleeping Giant early, or are able to still walk afterwards, go catch the last 30 or minutes of The Chariot. Their live show is nothing short of insane!  they also had one of our best albums from 2009 along with being one of our “Voices of The Underground”

Thursday Day two of the festival in full swing slows things down a little for me, but Thursday is possiably my most diverse day.
John Reuben 3:15PM- Main Stage: Regrettably, there isn’t a whole lot of hip-hop at Cornerstone this year, so I am going to be sure and not miss one of my all time favorites. Hey John, if you happen to read this, play “Doin’”, I will lose my mind over that song!

Brooke Waggoner 4:15PM- Gallery Stage: THIS IS A MUST SEE! We met Brooke Waggoner in 2009 at SXSW, and her live show made me a life long fan. If anything, you need to see this girl play piano, it will blow you away.  She was also featured in the original series of “Voices of The Underground”.

Hands 7:30PM- Underground Stage: i have already told the entire staff that Hands is the band I am most excited to see this year. They combine prog metal with worship music, and they never come around Austin. This will most likely be the highlight of my week.  They also had one of our best albums from 2009.

The Farewell Drifters 8:35PM- Gallery Stage: Sue me, I love folk/bluegrass music. The Farewell Drifters are one of the better bands today doing it. Therefore, I will be there.

For Today 10:35- Underground Stage: Like Sleeping Giant the night before, For Today bring a worshipful experience that just happens to be in the for of metal/hardcore. These guys speak truth, and this is one of those shows that can really have an impact.

Friday By this point most of yall will be getting tired, but dont snooze just yet because some great stuff is yet to be seen.
Timbre 2:05PM- Gallery Stage: What a great way to get things going with some soothing progressive harp music. Yep, I said harp….

Dignan 6:00PM- Gallery Stage: Once again, we met Dignan at SXSW in 2009 and were intimidately taken away with their dark , progressive indie rock. Haven’t had a chance to catch them again, so this will be a treat for sure.  They also released one of our best albums from 2009.

Paper Route 7:15PM- Gallery Stage: Would you like a little electronic dance music with your rock? Of course you would.  They also had one of our best albums from 2009.

Children 18:3 9:00PM- Underground Stage: This is possibly the best pop-punk band in the music scene today. we saw them at Red letter Rock Fest last year, and I am not going to miss this show.

Eisley 10:00PM- Gallery Stage: Ironically, the last time Chuck and I saw Eisley (known as Moss Eisley then) was the FIRST time we attended Cornerstone Fest in 2002. Some of the members were in their early teens, and they apologized after every song. Most of them are married now, and we have fallen in love with their music over and over again since. This will be a great reunion.

White Collar Sideshow 12AM- Underground Stage: I will end my day with a performance that has the ability to cut to the core of any person struggling with themselves. Besides the fact that the members of White Collar Sideshow are some of the coolest people ever, but their show will make you take a deep look within, and let change fill you up.

Saturday Last day, keep your head up, you are almost there.
Starting at about 1PM, The Legacy Stage is going to have a mini Hip-Hop showcase featuring some amazing talent including Odd Thomas, Propoganda, and Theory Hazit. If you are a fan of Hip-Hop, this would be a great place to hang out on Saturday.

O’Brother 6:00PM- Gallery Stage: I saw these guys with Manchester Orchestra, and I don’t think I’m stretching too much to say that they blew the crowd away. They are the heaviest indie rock band I have ever hear, and I am ready for round two.

August Burns Red 7:00PM- Main Stage: ABR is kind of another one of those bands that if you haven’t seen them at Cornerstone, then you haven’t really seen them. It is not too much to say that they owned Cornerstone 07 like nobodies business.

Seabird 10:00PM- Gallery Stage: My Cornerstone experience will end with the power pop/rock of Seabird. I saw them at SXSW, and now that I know their music a little better I know this will be the perfect closer to my week.

Thats about it, but certainly not my entire plan for the week. Go check my full schedule to see all the other shows I am going to try and hit. See you there!

New Releases For March 30,2010

charmaine love reality
Love Reality
Charmaine

in:ciite Records
Electro-Pop
Buy NOW:
Amazon MP3[+digital booklet]
iTunes

a hope for home realis
Realis
A Hope For Home

Facedown Records
Post-Hardcore/Metalcore
Buy NOW:
Amazon
iTunes

hundredth when will we surrender
When Will We Surrender
Hundredth

Mediaskare
Hardcore
Buy NOW:
Amazon
iTunes

shobaraka lions and liars
Lions & Liars
Sho Baraka

Reach Records
Hip-Hop
Buy NOW:
Amazon
iTunes(Bonus Track Version)

amy grant the road
Somewhere Down The Road
Amy Grant

Sparrow Records
Contemporary
Buy NOW:
Amazon
iTunes

paper route_additions ep
Addditions EP
Paper Route

Motown Records
Remixes
Buy NOW:
Amazon MP3
iTunes

manafest the chase
The Chase
Manafest

BEC Recordings
Rapcore
Buy NOW:
Amazon
iTunes

rawsrvnt_noordinarylove
No Ordinary Love
Rawsrvnt

Soul Deep Records
Rap
Buy NOW:
Amazon
iTunes

for more new releases, please check out our ALBUM RELEASE DATES page to stay up to date on all the new music coming out

A Hope For Home Ready New Album

Below is the album artwork and tracklisting for Facedown Records post-hardcore band A Hope For Home and their March 30th, 2010 release, Realis. A Hope For Homes last album, The Everlasting Man, was really very good, so there are high hopes for Realis and this talented up and coming band.

a hope for home realis

01. Nightfall
02. The Overman
03. Withering Branches
04. The Machine Stops
05. No Light
06. Post Tenebras Lux
07. First Light of Dawn
08. The Crippling Fear
09. The Warmth of the Heavens
10. Seasons
11. Ascension
12. After

for more new releases, please check out our ALBUM RELEASE DATES page to stay up to date on all the new music coming out

Facedown Records’ Young & Wreckless Tour Announced

youngandwrecklesstour

Yesterday, Facedown Records (home of War Of Ages, For Today, A Plea For Purging, ect.) announced a monster tour featuring their newest artists to the label. the tour will feature A Hope for Home, Hands, Onward To Olympas,In The Midst Of Lions:

We are happy to announce the Facedown Records “Young & Wreckless Tour” that spotlights our up and coming bands. This will be a full US tour that kicks off in mid March and runs through April. The tour consists of In The Midst Of Lions, Hands, A Hope For Home and Onward To Olympas. Check out the tours section for all the dates and make sure to check out all 4 of these great bands. The “Young & Wreckless Tour” is brought to you by Outburn Magazine, Merch Now and Black Rose District Clothing.

March 12 – Carthage, MO @ The Powerhouse
March 13 – Camdenton, MO @ The Warehouse
March 16 – Terre Haute, IN @ THMV The Venue
March 18 – Fort Wayne, IN @ Broadripple
March 19 – Grand Ledge, MI @ Imagine This
March 20 – Pittsburgh, PA @ The Smiling Moose
March 22 – Montclair, NJ @ The Meatlocker
March 23 – Baltimore, MD @ Macc
March 25 – East Ridge, TN @ The Warehouse
March 26 – Cape Girardeau, MO @ 4H
March 27 – Bartlett, TN @ T.H.A.T. Church
March 28 – Dacula, GA @ Awake
March 30 – Jacksonville, FL @ Murray Hill Theatre
March 31 – Tampa, FL @ Transitions Art Gallery
April 1 – Kissimmee, FL @ Second Saturday Showcase
April 3 – Madison, AL @ Cornerstone Church
April 5 – Little Rock, AR @ Vinos
April 6 – Tulsa, OK @ The Marquee
April 7 – Wichita, KS @ Eagles Lodge
April 8 – Dallas, TX @ Fat Daddy’s
April 9 – Waco, TX @ Art Ambush
April 10 – San Antonio, TX @ White Rabbit
April 11 – Wichita Falls, TX @ Falls Music Complex
April 13 – Albuquerque, NM @ TBA
April 14 – Tempe, AZ @ 23 West
April 15 – Yucca Valley, CA @ Joshua Spring Calvary
April 16 – Canoga Park, CA @ Cobalt Cafe
April 17 – Rancho Cucamonga, CA @ The Nitty Gritty
April 18 – Palmdale, CA @ The Crossing
April 19 – Sebastopol, CA @ Mt GIlead
April 20 – Klamath Falls, OR @ Contemporary Artist Kitchen
April 22 – Twin Falls, ID @ River Christian Fellowship

A Hope Home Set Title For New Album

Facedown Records newcomers A Hope For Home have set Realis as the title for their label debut album. A Hope For Home posted the following earlier this week:

We have decided to name our new record “Realis.” It will be coming out on March 30th, 2010. We should have some new studio updates here really soon, and sooner or later we will have a new song for all of you to hear!!

Voices of The Underground2 Finale

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Voices Of The Underground is a series that seeks to explore one question from many different angles. Every week, we will ask one question of many of your favorite music artists. We will post their responses below, and what you will find is that there is never truly one answer to every question, but instead a whole world of ideas that come from simple matters of taste, to deep held beliefs. Our hope is that through this series you are able to see past the promo pictures and the stage persona, and get to know the hearts of believers who are creating music every day.

Need to catch up?
Read Pt.1-What do you love about music?
Read Pt.2- What was your first musical experience?
Read Pt.3-What is your favorite/ultimate song?
Read Pt.4-What is the best live show you have ever seen?
Read Pt.5-If you hadn’t gotten into music, what would see yourself doing as a job?
Read Pt.6-Who is Jesus Christ to you?
Read Pt.7-What is Christian music?
Read Pt.8- The facets of the Christian music?
Read Pt.9-Can art/music not have a message behind it?
Read Pt.10-How do you keep yourself accountable in your out on the road?
Read Pt.11-What are your opinions on the modern music industry?
Read Pt.12-Is it easier or harder to be a musician today in contrast to maybe 10 years ago?
Read Pt.13-What is the one thing that people don’t understand about YOUR music?
Read Pt.14-What responsibility (if any) does an artist/performer have to it’s listener?

For the fan reading this right now or listening to your music and wanting to start a band/career of their own, what is some advice you could give them that you didn’t know starting out?

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I’m going to address the girls: (Keep in mind that these are lessons I’ve learned the hard way….I wish I could have been wiser when I was young!)
Discipline yourself to write songs and learn your instruments and train your voice. I’ll gently suggest that you try to include your family as much as possible. You need accountability. Be modest in your heart and in your dress. Give your music to God now, before pride becomes an issue. (That was one of my big ones- I thought I was so awesome. Man, I was dumb.) Pray for open doors, but don’t just sit and wait for something good to fall in your lap. Again, discipline yourself in your art so you’ll be ready if you get the chance to share your music with the world!

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I would say for starters that there is more to life than being in a band. Not to be a downer, because I love doing this so, so much, but I think a lot of young bands have the tendency to elevate the idea of being in a band, an how “cool” that is, above a lot of things like friendships and relationships and maybe the other things God has called us to do. I’m not discouraging anyone from starting a band, but if you’re starting a band and your bass player really wants to go to college or get married or whatever, he’s not a jerk and you should still talk to him and be his friend. I’ve seen a lot of friends in bands, as well as myself, thinking being in a band is then end-all-be-all to my entire life, but there is so much more to God’s creation and kingdom than playing rock and roll.

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My advice is to not read reviews. Whether they are good or bad, finding out what a stranger thinks of what you’re making is always a negative experience. Even if it is on a sub-conscious level, you end up seeking approval instead of being open.

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Be less concerned with what is cool or trendy and more aware of creating music that you feel is genuine and well written.

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Focus on God and build relationships with others. The great commandment. Be honest, transparent and wear your heart on your sleeve. Through this, you can be the change you want to see in the world. Don’t worry about “industry, business, units, friends or Myspace plays.” Just do what God is calling you to do and focus on him.

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Don’t start your band and start touring right away. Take your time building your local fan base, then gradually tour out regionally, then eventually and slowly work your way out to different areas of the country. Don’t expect to make money right away, unless your a cover band for some strange reason. And be smart with your money you do have, as much as it sucks, money can really make or break your band. Try to save on whatever you can, recording costs, duplication, merch, etc. I don’t know. This is all business stuff. But that’s what I wish we knew when we started.

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If you like writing, and playing music, don’t forget that you like writing and playing music.

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Be humble, don’t have expectations other than to be a vessel of the Lord. Work to perfect your art. If you aren’t completely happy with a song don’t make us listen to it. Throw it away and write a new one. God demands our best and He deserves it. Be willing to play to a room of 2 people. You are not above it. And most of all, SMILE IN YOUR BAND PHOTOS!

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Follow the path that God is opening up for you. Be FAITHFUL in the opportunities you are given… Make sure you are following God’s path, not someone else’s path that you are trying to emulate. You don’t wanna become an imitator of some other band. Just be in prayer, seek after God – and walk through the doors that he opens for you. And continue to be faithful once he gives you the opportunity.

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It’s not as easy as it seems. If it’s not about the music, it’s not gonna work.

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The best advice is to not get ahead of yourself. A lot of musicians want to start a band, and hit the road the next day. I think it is important to build up a local fan base, to spend time writing quality music, and make sure you are going to do decent on the road. I know we hit the road for a brief summer tour 2 years ago, and we were not ready for the road at all. We had no idea what we were doing yet, and our music was not up to par for a touring band at the time. We also ended up getting $6,000 worth of gear stolen out of our trailer.

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Practice! Always keep your priorities straight. If you’re a Christian band keep God first. Whatever your band has to say believe in it and practice it.

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If any of you desire to make it as a musician, I must stress to you, that you must know your instrument. Practice your instrument and get good at it, a band only makes it if they’re good. Be a good person with a good personality, it’s hard to be in a band with someone they can’t get along with.

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Don’t quit. Don’t let anyone tell you that you can’t do something. Put Him first and all will be added to you.

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Be patient, everything in this industry takes time. What makes you/your band stand out from the rest(musical identity)? Find that, and embrace it. If you’re in it for the money, stop now. God will bless you if you’re faithful, and you work hard, but you need to be ready to eat at gas stations and sleep on van floors for a while….sometimes a long while. It’s all about awareness, get your band/music in front of people. God will do the impossible if you do the possible.

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Just make music out of love for it. Music totally sucks when you get into the whole rat-race. I’m constantly fighting that. Just dig your head into the notes and love every part of it.

*NOTE: this is the last of our Voices Of The Underground series. Thanks to all of the artists that participated, its been really great getting to know you guys better. Thanks to everybody who has been reading VOTU since we started it almost 8 months ago! For now, this is going to be the end of the series, we feel it is time to move on and do some some new stuff. Thanks again….

Voices Of The Underground2 Pt.14

votu2logo-copy2

Voices Of The Underground is a series that seeks to explore one question from many different angles. Every week, we will ask one question of many of your favorite music artists. We will post their responses below, and what you will find is that there is never truly one answer to every question, but instead a whole world of ideas that come from simple matters of taste, to deep held beliefs. Our hope is that through this series you are able to see past the promo pictures and the stage persona, and get to know the hearts of believers who are creating music every day.

Need to catch up?
Read Pt.1-What do you love about music?
Read Pt.2- What was your first musical experience?
Read Pt.3-What is your favorite/ultimate song?
Read Pt.4-What is the best live show you have ever seen?
Read Pt.5-If you hadn’t gotten into music, what would see yourself doing as a job?
Read Pt.6-Who is Jesus Christ to you?
Read Pt.7-What is Christian music?
Read Pt.8- The facets of the Christian music?
Read Pt.9-Can art/music not have a message behind it?
Read Pt.10-How do you keep yourself accountable in your out on the road?
Read Pt.11-What are your opinions on the modern music industry?
Read Pt.12-Is it easier or harder to be a musician today in contrast to maybe 10 years ago?
Read Pt.13-What is the one thing that people don’t understand about YOUR music?

What responsibility (if any) does an artist/performer have to it’s listener?

future-of-forestry-copy
Being honest and doing his/her best.

thousand-foot-krutch-fm-static-copy
The choice is ultimately up to the artist to care about this or not, but I’d say the minute you decided to play music for a living, you decided to be a role model, whether you like it or not. And you can have a positive or negative effect..it’s up to you.

wonder-copy
I believe we as artists are accountable for everything we write, record, perform, and speak. We are supposed to be examples of who or what we serve. I know I will fall short but i pray as this journey continues that I can represent Christ to all who i come across.

mychildren-mybride-copy
In our line of work, we must stay on path. If we label ourselves a Christian band and try to set an example for the kids that come to see us, and we are caught doing something bad, such as doing drugs or fighting, we failed as a Christian example. I feel we must stay in line for the ministry’s sake and that we must play good music.

love-begotten-copy
It depends on the artist. As for my band we feel our responsibility is to love our listener and be with them as much as possible whether its prayer or just conversations about anything they want to talk about. It means the world to us that people take the time to listen or watch us or whatever.

venia-copy
Well I think that the responsibility is to care about your fans. To try to write music that speaks to the people who listen to your band, to care about making relationships with those who relate to your music, and to always try to give your shows 100 percent so everyone who pays to see you has a good time. Our favorite part about being a band is making friends all over the county. We have met some of the most amazing people in the last year of touring, and its been nothing but amazing.

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I guess the only thing I can think of is one particular scenario. If you’re performing for someone who has paid money to see you perform, at least make an effort to perform to the best of your ability. I mean, they paid money, you know?

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The artist should be responsible to explain what the message of their music is I think… Even if there is no direct message. I think often an artist can write songs about things that are not necessarily the message they really want to communicate. I think that artists should be willing to explain to their listeners what they are really trying to communicate through their music.

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None. Their responsibility is to the Lord. Fans are fickle. They will abandon you over a bad interview (which will probably happen to be after this one), or if you don’t scream enough on your new album or something. It’s crazy. Follow God, not people. They are fans, not idols.

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When you are musician people look to you, whether you like it or not and they listen to what you have to say whether its worth listening to or not. As for me, in the past I have struggled with the weight of responsibility that is placed on me as a Christian, who is also a musician. How do you minister to everyone? How do you always be the best example? You can go mental trying to find the right formula. But the Lord revealed to me that you simply have to listen, be sensitive to His spirit, and just be real. This is my responsibility.

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To put out heartfelt music, even if it’s different from the last record, or takes a totally different direction. Artists responsibilities are to stay true to what they love.

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We do what we do to glorify God. To raise him up and spread his message of love and hope. As long as we are open and honest about this, I don’t feel like our “listeners” would demand anything from us other than the Truth.

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The answer to that really depends on why you’re creating music. For us, we hope to share a message of love, understanding, compassion, justice, etc. and I see it as our responsibility to do so, both for those hearing us and those they can act in these ways towards.

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An artist should make things that they like, that they think are good. That seems to be the most generous thing they can do for their audience.

a-hope-for-home-votu2-copy1
Man that’s a tough question. When artists start creating art to please an audience, I really think the art suffers. Sure it may sell well and make the kids dance at the shows, and if that’s your thing then go for it, but if the goal is to create art, then it will suffer if you start trying to please everyone else. I think more that artists have a responsibility to society to effectively translate the human condition and social issues into art that speaks to people, even if just themselves. The ability to create and recognize art is what separates us from all other forms of life on this planet, and I think it is crucial to us as a people and society to endear.

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For every artist there is a different answer. I can only speak for myself: I have a huge responsibility. I have been called to live my life to the glory of God, and that standard applies to my music.

Voices Of The Underground2 Pt.13

votu2logo-copy2

Voices Of The Underground is a series that seeks to explore one question from many different angles. Every week, we will ask one question of many of your favorite music artists. We will post their responses below, and what you will find is that there is never truly one answer to every question, but instead a whole world of ideas that come from simple matters of taste, to deep held beliefs. Our hope is that through this series you are able to see past the promo pictures and the stage persona, and get to know the hearts of believers who are creating music every day.

Need to catch up?
Read Pt.1-What do you love about music?
Read Pt.2- What was your first musical experience?
Read Pt.3-What is your favorite/ultimate song?
Read Pt.4-What is the best live show you have ever seen?
Read Pt.5-If you hadn’t gotten into music, what would see yourself doing as a job?
Read Pt.6-Who is Jesus Christ to you?
Read Pt.7-What is Christian music?
Read Pt.8- The facets of the Christian music?
Read Pt.9-Can art/music not have a message behind it?
Read Pt.10-How do you keep yourself accountable in your out on the road?
Read Pt.11-What are your opinions on the modern music industry?
Read Pt.12-Is it easier or harder to be a musician today in contrast to maybe 10 years ago?

What is the one thing that people don’t understand about YOUR music?

a-hope-for-home-votu2-copy1
Oh man. Well there are a lot of things that frustrate me, but I try to focus just on making music and not pleasing anyone’s conception’s of who we are. It does get frustrating sometimes because since we don’t play breakdowns, I feel we get lumped into the “screamo” scene, which I guess might be slightly warranted but I really feel like we offer more than just a “screamo” band. Maybe that will translate better on our next record. But overall I really feel that most of the people that listen to us see what we are doing and what it means, and that’s really all I could ask for.

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Once in a while people call Meredith (edt. the keyboard player, other main vocalist in Bodies Of Water. She is also David’s wife) my sister, but she isn’t my sister. It is an easy mistake to make, we look related.

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Since we function as a band almost entirely outside the “Christian music bubble”, I would have to say our biggest challenge is preventing people from assuming we’re hate-filled, judgmental, etc. simply because we are Christians. Essentially, we shoulder the burden of disproving all the stereotypes associated with American Christianity that fall short of being Biblically sound.

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Too many people judge the book by the cover. They see our picture and instantly say no. They are not willing to give us or our music a chance.

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That we are a “Christian” band as in “Our target audience is Christians.” I would never want anyone to think that we are solely aiming for Christians. I just want people to listen to our music and make up their own minds.

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People never know where to put us. Music has so many genre’s now but we don’t really fit into one, which I’m okay with. We aren’t screamo, and we aren’t metal. We say we are punk rock, fun times, but that doesn’t always go over well.

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People think that worship music is supposed to be serious and ambient. Mine is happy and clappy and folky and fun. I always play shows with other worship bands and it is always so serious. Sometimes it feels like my worship music doesn’t fit in… which is a shame because very little of the worship in the scriptures was sad and serious. It was often crazy… David danced naked in the streets, remember that?
People rely heavily on what I call the “holy spirit pedal”. The second it fades in, everyone’s hands gone into the air and their eyes all close and they start to sway. Once in a while they should smile and make eye contact with each other, nod their heads and clap. Sing loudly and obnoxiously. Make a joyful noise.

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We often run into the question or confusion as to whether or not we are gonna actually lead a worship time – or play a show. We always want to make it clear that our intention is to always lead people into a time of worship. We are not really interested in playing a “show”. For most people, when they listen to our music at length they will easily discover the heart behind it – which is straight up worship. But, from time to time we still find ourselves at gigs where we are expected to “perform” a show to some degree…

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I don’t think I’ve come across anyone who didn’t “understand” our music. A lot of people don’t LIKE our music. But it’s music, not everyone is going to like the same stuff. No big deal.


I think the biggest mis-conception about our music is that kids always think we are a straight edge band. Many of our members are part of the straight edge community, however Venia does not write music about the straight edge lifestlye. We have a lot of kids thinking that is one of the main themes of our music, but that isnt the case, even though many of us are involved in that lifestyle.

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I think its usually the screaming people don’t get how that can be “Christian” or it’s just not easy on people’s ears.

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Towards this band, people misconstrue the fact that we are a Christian band. As I mentioned, we attempt to reach out to the rest of the world and they might understand our message so they just take it as we are just another metal band.

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People judge off the appearance. They see the tattoos and piercings and dont expect me to be an emcee. Sorry Im not in a tall t. haha.

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That we’re just a hard rock band…our records cover a lot of different ground musically, and I hope you can embrace that and see it translate live.

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I hate the whole rock-star thing. Mostly, the expectation people have for you to be that. I hate trying to be cool! It pains me to see some bands buying into the cool factor and fans eating it up. I really wish people just liked music because they connected to it on a personal level. Not because its some coolness factor popularity contest. If that’s what this is, I definitely loose.

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The biggest misconception is that we are not only here for the people in the church. We make music for both Christian and non-Christians, but God has called us do go into the battlefield (which is outside of the safety of church walls) and reach the people who wont step foot into a church.

Voices Of The Underground2 Pt.12

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Voices Of The Underground is a series that seeks to explore one question from many different angles. Every week, we will ask one question of many of your favorite music artists. We will post their responses below, and what you will find is that there is never truly one answer to every question, but instead a whole world of ideas that come from simple matters of taste, to deep held beliefs. Our hope is that through this series you are able to see past the promo pictures and the stage persona, and get to know the hearts of believers who are creating music every day.

Need to catch up?
Read Pt.1-What do you love about music?
Read Pt.2- What was your first musical experience?
Read Pt.3-What is your favorite/ultimate song?
Read Pt.4-What is the best live show you have ever seen?
Read Pt.5-If you hadn’t gotten into music, what would see yourself doing as a job?
Read Pt.6-Who is Jesus Christ to you?
Read Pt.7-What is Christian music?
Read Pt.8- The facets of the Christian music?
Read Pt.9-Can art/music not have a message behind it?
Read Pt.10-How do you keep yourself accountable in your out on the road?
Read Pt.11-What are your opinions on the modern music industry?

Is it easier or harder to be a musician today in contrast to maybe 10 years ago?

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I wasn’t really a pro musician 10 years ago so I’m not sure what it is like – but I do know that from a management standpoint – I think it is easier. We are able to completely self-manage and self-book ourselves, even while being on the road. We are able to have direct connection to our fans. The internet has revolutionized how quickly and efficiently we are able to do things as a touring band. No need to have a booking agency on the other side of the country setting up shows for us. Anyone can email us at any time, and we will get it instantly – even while traveling. So, I do think all these technological advances have made it easier to be a professional touring musician.

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Both. It’s easier in that music is way more accessible now. Like I said, with myspace and facebook it’s really easy to get your name out there. But at the same time, with those outlets come more and more bands becoming popular. There are SO many bands out there now. It seems like you have to be especially good and original in order to even be noticed on a larger scale. But in the end, as long as you’re making music you enjoy, then you shouldn’t worry about all the other stuff.

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Anyone and everyone can record an album on their computer and have it around the world in a matter of days. This is something that musicians used to dream of, and it is far more important than money.
It is a good time to be a musician.

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I am not sure since I was not a musician 10 years ago, but I think it is more difficult now days. High gas prices, less record sales, and a struggling economy really makes it harder to stay on the road. It seems harder to book shows now as well, since the gas prices are higher, the bands guarantees every night has to be higher, because of this, the door prices are higher. Since the door charge is higher for the kids to come out, there are less merch sales to help the bands get by.

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I would have to say that it is way easier now to be a musician. There are way more bands to compete with but it is way easier to get your foot in the door. Every band has a free website,myspace, that can promote their band all over the world. Its easier to get a decent recording of your music with digital recording and the availability of it on personal computers, and its easier to tour; more venues, GPS, cell phones (not pay phone and pagers), and 24 hr restaurants.

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I’m not too sure, we’re definitely in the DIY generation where we can book our own shows put out our own music and tour without losing too much money. At the same time there’s so much competition when we book a tour we usually notice a few other tours going the same route as us.

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Depends on what you’re trying to achieve. Stardom? Then i would say yes, because there are so many bands out there trying to do the same thing. Making Art? then I would say it’s just the same as 10 years ago. Art is art if people like it, they like it. If they don’t, then they don’t.

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I would say a little harder, even though I was not a professional musician 10 years ago, I imagine it being a little easier. With the simplification of digital music presently it is easier to compose music such as pop or hip hop, it makes it easier for the rest of the world to compose music as well. So there is a huge group of musicians trying to make it now and there is so much variety for people to choose from. Plus, it is hard for one to be original and come up with something fresh that people haven’t heard and want to hear. 10 years ago, the economy wasn’t in such a recession as now, and it was simpler for people to go see live music… but I could be wrong, I wasn’t making music 10 years ago.

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We have no clue! 10 years ago, I was on drugs working in a factory and Veronica was finishing her last year of college, lol. I guess the internet has helped many bands gain instant success, however–from what we hear, several venues have shut down over the years and others have scaled their shows back to just a few a month, so it’s a give and take. We are just thankful that we get to tour with cell phones and a GPS!!!!

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Harder to sell records now because: the market is over saturated with bands, we’re in a recession, and people are stealing music at an all time high. Labels are signing less bands now, BUT with the technology we have, artists who can barely sing/play are getting signed, and that would have never happened before. Bands have it a lot easier now as far as spreading the word/building their buzz, before the internet, we used to have to mail everything out by hand and make calls.

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I would say it’s incredibly easier to be a musician today. You can let people around the world hear your music for a fraction of the cost it would have taken 10 years ago, if you could have even accomplished the same.

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Times change. There might of been less people doing it then, but less technology to get your name out back then too. So I believe it just balances itself out.

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I don’t know. My impression is that neither era is an ‘easy’ or ‘hard’ one to work in – they just have different sets of problems.

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In most ways yes. Financially, it’s a lot harder. But for indie artists, it’s a lot easier. You don’t have to be on a label now to make it.

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I don’t know. Ten years ago, the music industry had just received the warning bell that the golden age of actually making money in music was nearing the end. Whole record labels would survive off of one hit record. That was great for all the little bands who deserved to be out there but weren’t selling enough.
What’s great about this new era is that bands have to be creative in getting their music out there. The pool spilled into an ocean, and that’s the hard part. There is SO MUCH MUSIC out there.

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I don’t think there’s a difference because it’s always been hard. Its always hard to find the perfect label and management who will support you and back you.

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Well without the internet, we wouldn’t have been able to book our first tours, make fans over myspace, be noticed by a genre label like we did, or any of that. Without technology we wouldn’t have been able to record our 2 albums by ourselves and press them for relatively cheap. So its much much easier. But, because its easier, there are tons more bands than there ever used to be, or at least tons more bands that are trying to make it. Which, basically creates a whole different set of problems!