Free Download: See You On The Other Side…

See You On The Other Side... Holdfast Records 2006-2009

We are back on regular updates this week, and so Wednesday brings our free download, and I thought it would be cool to start things off with a Holdfast Records compilation. See You On The Other Side… Holdfast Records 2006-2009 is a chronicling of all the cool metal, hardcore, and hard rock that underground label Holdfast has been offering over the last three years. There is a little metalcore, some southern rock, and even a little electronica in there for good measure. Here is the tracklisting:

01. In Irons – Trust Not in Man (5:27)
02. Alcina – A Fist Full of Regrets (4:21)
03. Before There Was Rosalyn – A Shadow of the Things We Know (3:00)
04. Through Solace – Further from the Truth (5:10)
05. The Black Noise Party Boys – Spend the Night Party (1:55)
06. The Skies Revolt – The Transitive Deficiency (3:25)
07. The Skies Revolt – She Had To (4:29)
08. The Wolverines – From Living, to Death, Then to Life (3:32)
09. The Wolverines – I Buy Land and Timber (3:39)
10. This Love These Hands – Don’t Call It a Comeback (4:32)
11. This Love These Hands – I’m King of the World (4:27)
12. Poorly Built Parachute – The Confrontation (3:09)
13. Materia Medica – The Kilowatt Hours (2:11)
14. Materia Medica – The Awakened (3:43)

ENJOY!!!

Download See You On The Other Side… Holdfast Records 2006-2009

Voices Of The Underground Pt.4

voicesoftheundergroundlogo-copy2

Several weeks ago One21 Music posed fifteen questions to a number of music artists in the Christian music scene, ranging from the light-hearted to the deeply spiritual. We received many responses, some very helpful, and some…. not so much. Some of the answers were short and sweet, some were extensive and eloquent. Many expressed frustrations with the current landscape of the music industry, while others were hopeful for a future of uncertainty. We heard from guys who had been performing for years, and bands that are just now starting to get their names heard. From indie rock to hip-hop, from hardcore to worship, the Christian music scene spoke back to us.

Realize that these answers are by the people making the music that you are listening to, and these are un-edited and real. The opinions expressed don’t always reflect ours, but we aren’t perfect, right?

Need to catch up?
Read Pt.1- What Do You Love About Music?
Read Pt.2- What Are Some Of Your Favorite Albums/CDs?
Read Pt.3- What Is The Best Thing About Making Music?

This week we start to brave more serious territory.  In the last ten years, we have seen a dramatic turn in the music industry as a whole. With the birth of companies like Napster, iTunes, and a rise in interest for more independently made music, the whole model of how business works concerning music has been spun on its head. The music industry, be it the Christian market or mainstream, is no longer what it used to be. We asked out artists what they thought, and their answers were….well, see for yourself:

What is your opinion of the music industry today? What has changed? What NEEDS to change?

johanna fellow Johanna Miller (keyboardist/singer for South Pawl pop/rock band Fellow) Fellow
The music industry doesn’t always make sense to me. My band (Fellow) has played with so many talented musicians that work hard but they don’t ever make it to the next level they’re striving for. Then you see bands that have “made it” and they don’t even realize how blessed they really are for being given that opportunity.
I wish there was a better way for artists to do what they’re called to do without having to work three jobs and then be expected to perform for free because it’s a ministry.

amycourts Amy Courts (independent pop/folk artist)                                      Amy Courts
I think the music industry, in general, is in the midst of both its worst and best times. Major Labels are fighting to survive, and the Machine is breaking, and yet they still control so much of the radio waves and distribution outlets. Add to that the “American Idol” culture which can make anyone, talented or not, a worldwide superstar overnight (and giving them a piece of the pie earned by artists who’ve spent years working hard to get what’s been arbitrarily given away), and you’ve got a pretty ugly business market that doesn’t favor the bottom-rungers at all. In that way, it’s discouraging, because it’s back-breaking to try and fight a way through to make this lifestyle sustainable. But on the other hand, with the advent of internet technology and online forums and free web communities and download outlets, it’s never been easier for independent artists to build a fan base, tour the world, produce and sell merchandise, and remain totally independent and in control of their art. We don’t have to sell our souls to get somewhere anymore.

hylandjon Jon (lead singer/guitarist for independent pop/rock band Hyland)            Hyland
I think the biggest thing right now is that CDs are still the main medium used to listen to music. It’s a 10 year old product!!! When CDs came out we were still watching movies on VHS. Now we’re not only pushing beyond DVDs we’re well into Blu-Ray. My point being is that to keep music competitive in this market, we need something new. A high-def way to listen to music would be a good start. And also getting people away from the mindset of ‘i just want LOTS of music’ instead of caring about what music they have is something that needs to change.

inhaleexhalejohninveryback John (guitarist for Solid State Records metal band Inhale Exhale) Inhale Exhale
I think the music business is the worse business to get into. With Myspace, music has open doors for some very good bands, has closed the door on some, and has created a pedestal for some terrible bands with no talent. Music has also become a trend in it’s self. It’s now a fashion statement. Some people don’t care about what they are listening to, they just care how someone looks. I think integrity has left the scene. It’s sad.

runkidrundavidoneinhat David (lead singer/guitarist for Tooth & Nail pop/rock band Run Kid Run) Run Kid Run
I think it has gotten better of late… bands are way more independent and can easily make an impact without a label. Which I thing is a good thing.

dirt DIRT (underground hip-hop artist and founder of Shadow Of The Locust) Dirt
I have too many opinions about this to express here. But in my travels and experience, the Secular Music Industry needs to wake up and stop peddling smut into our minds and hearts (people are dying, literally, from the foul messages) and the Christian Music Industry needs to stand up and support the front line musicians trying to spread Good News (stop letting the world steal our creative idea’s and call it their own).

corpuschristijarrodinfront Jarrod(guitarist/singer from Victory Records metal band Corpus Christi) Corpus Christi
It’s in a unique state. Everything has changed, and the industry is scrambling to catch up with it.
The next change needs to be the death of Clear Channel. An industry without them is something I would love to see!

christaylor Chris Taylor (BEC solo artist/song writer)                                          Chris Taylor
Not sure, people want music and they’re getting it, seems pretty solid now in that regard. People are getting so much so quick and so cheap. Not sure that kinda model is good for any people group. Savoring is good once in a while.

sethinfrontendervence Seth (singer for independent hard rock band Endeverance)             Endeverance
My opinion on the music industry is that it has lost its genuine quality…I mean you look now it’s all about the popstar and not about being the artist, it’s about selling records and not making amazing art…I mean you look at American Idol all the other stupid Idol competitions, and my personal opinion is that they have ruined the music industry…Yes great musicians and artists have come from these places but the way winning is advertised on these shows is that it is all about being a star. And I just look back and see like Johnny Cash, Bob Dylan, and The Beatles, and it wasn’t about being a star it was about writing what you had on your mind and making the best music possible…And what needs to change is that the record companies have to quit prostituting all the artist’s and their music…I mean just get behind an artist and let them write a great song…Not maybe a hit song but a song that can strike a chord with the people and not just another useless pop song…

bryanblondstreakabandon Bryan (bass player for Forefront Records pop/rock band Abandon) Abandon
In short, the industry has really gotten itself in quite a bind. I do believe however, that we are on the upswing and things will be getting better soon. Digital music, Myspace, Purevolume, and illegal downloading have changed the music industry drastically. People need to buy more stinkin’ records!!!

brookewaggner Brooke Waggoner(solo indie/pop artist on SlowMoon Music)                 Brooke Waggoner
Honestly, this question keeps getting tossed around so much, I think it’s time to adjust, adapt, and do the best you can. I think the changes are fairly obvious (people don’t buy as much music anymore because it’s information overload now. Too much to sift through) So, this in turn makes bands/artists get more creative which is kind of cool in my opinion…

brandonsayyouwill Brandon (bass player for independent pop/rock band Say You Will)
The music industry is dying and musicians are essentially fighting to survive amidst the corpses. No one buys anything except for merch and tickets. Even then, if you aren’t signed you won’t have to exposure to sell thousands of tickets, but labels are signing less and less because they’re slowly consolidating. It’s a real catch 22. What needs to and will happens I believe is a brilliant person will come along and restructure how this whole industry works, and that is what will save it and aid it in growing.

daveleftpoorlybuitparachute Dave (half of Holdfast Records electro-house duo Poorly Built Parachute) Poorly Built Parachute
Here is what I believe, unless a big-wig record label is ready to offer you real money, a salary, not bull crap, then stay independent. I think it’s retarded that bands sign over the rights to their music forever merely on a gamble that they might make a dollar here and there. A lot of labels look for ways to screw bands. I’d rather stay indie and keep music on the DL rather than sell my soul and end up in debt to a label.

echocastbandwb8David ( singer for independent nu-metal band Echocast)                   Echocast
I think the music industry is hurting today… Labels don’t develop artists anymore, they try to push out that one radio single and then let the artist die… Downloading has killed record sales and high fuel prices have hurt touring bands that don’t have huge label support…

mahoganyjones Mahogany Jones (independent hip-hop artist)                                      Mahogany Jones
So much about the music industry has changed. It used to be where labels believed in backing and putting out good music and supporting great musicians and artist, but now so much of the music industry is a machine that’s centered on making money, no matter if the music that’s being released is exploiting a generation. What’s new about the industry that’s kind of cool is that because of the digital age, a lot of great musicians can independent of a record label deliver their music to the people minus the filter of the Industry. What needs to change… sigh, it’s not necessarily the industry but the people that need to change. If consumers took more of an active role in deeming what they considered worthy of consumption, it may help in dictating what gets released.

Voices Of the Underground Pt. 1

voicesoftheundergroundlogo-copy22

Several weeks ago One21 Music posed fifteen questions to a number of music artists in the Christian music scene, ranging from the light-hearted to the deeply spiritual. We received many responses, some very helpful, and some…. not so much. Some of the answers were short and sweet, some were extensive and eloquent. Many expressed frustrations with the current landscape of the music industry, while others were hopeful for a future of uncertainty. We heard from guys who had been performing for years, and bands that are just now starting to get their names heard. From indie rock to hip-hop, from hardcore to worship, the Christian music scene spoke back to us.

Realize that these answers are by the people making the music that you are listening to, and these are un-edited and real. The opinions expressed don’t always reflect ours, but we aren’t perfect, right?

This week we asked the question posed by the main character of the 2000 film Almost Famous. Ever since I saw the movie, the innocence and simplicity of the question has always appealed to me. People always want to talk about what they love, so we gave our artists a chance to do just that.

What do you love about music?

the_welcome_wagon_-_0938-c Vito (half of Asthamic Kitty indie/folk band The Welcome Wagon) The Welcome Wagon
I think of music as a conduit that can connect people to each other, and connect us to God. There is nothing more important than   that—being united to God, and to one another—and there are few things that can do that better than music.

hylandjon Jon (lead singer/guitarist for pop/rock band Hyland)                              Hyland
Music is such a big part of my life. It’s able to pick up where words leave off, or express words/thoughts and emotions in ways that people can connect to. I love music for so many reasons.

runkidrundavidoneinhat David (lead singer/guitarist for Tooth & Nail pop/rock band Run Kid Run) Run Kid Run
I love the power music has with your emotions from a great melody that just makes you hum along on a beautiful day or a quiet song that brings you to tears or a song that gives you energy and moves you.

dirt DIRT (underground hip-hop artist and founder of Shadow Of The Locust) Dirt
Music has the authority to move people… LITERALLY move them! From one emotion to the next. Music can save a life or end it. Music can change the atmosphere, good or bad. Music can start a needed revolution and quell a dictatorship. We receive music through our ears, but it is translated in our souls. Our brains deciphers the organized sound, but our hearts move us to action with the messages depicted.

hill Brett Hill (Paradigm Nashville solo country artist)                                    Brett Hill
It is a way to express the heart and the spirit, and also a way to reach others who respond to music.

christaylor Chris Taylor (BEC solo artist/song writer)                                             Chris Taylor
It makes mile 7 and 8 so much easier.

amycourts Amy Courts (independent pop/folk artist)                                  Amy Courts
The communicative nature of it, and how any given song, depending on its melody, progression, and subject matter, can draw the most unsuspecting, motley crowd together in unity as some part of the song resonates with each individual.

brookewaggner Brooke Waggoner(solo indie/pop artist on SlowMoon Music)             Brooke Waggoner
The freedom and retreat of it all.

ourproclamationfrankieinstrips Frankie (vocalist for Infantry Records hardcore band Our Proclamation) Our Proclamation
Music is the purest of all art forms. I love the being able to have a different soundtrack depending on my mood, and I love how my music can have an effect on people’s lives.

mahoganyjones Mahogany Jones (independent hip-hop artist)                                       Mahogany Jones
I love that music soothes emotions and mind and is a tool that God uses to help draw us closer to Him when we use it to praise Him and to worship Him.

domicballi Dominic Balli (independent Reggae/hip-hop artist)                                 Dominic Balli
It can stir the human heart deeper than any other created thing. Truly. That’s why a movie without a sound track isn’t much of a movie. I think then, worshiping God through music become one of the deepest things we can do to express our love to him. For me, it’s also a medium by which I communicate to the world around me.

heathstripsinirons Heath (bass player for Holdfast Records metal band In Irons)          In Irons
It’s just simply a way for people to connect. No matter the race, background, or beliefs of a person, we can all come together through music and its just a beautiful thing.

sethinfrontendervence Seth (singer for independent hard rock band Endeverance)               Endeverance
I love that it can draw people from different backgrounds and different points of view to come together under one purpose and understanding if even only for a few minutes…I love that it is a great release for frustrations and even struggles…But most of all it brings people together…

bryanblondstreakabandon Bryan (bass player for Forefront Records pop/rock band AbandonAbandon
Music is the best possible way to express yourself in my opinion. I love being able to write songs that truly mean something to me personally. There is no greater feeling than singing and playing my heart out on stage every night. It is truly amazing how much music has an impact on people’s hearts too. My favorite part about what we so is seeing lives changed through these lyrics and songs that God has blessed us with.

daveleftpoorlybuitparachute Dave (half of  Holdfast Records electro-house duo Poorly Built Parachute) Poorly Built Parachute
Music has always been a means of spilling out the true emotions within my heart. I’m a Christian, go to Church, try to prayer a lot… but I have a past that was not so pleasant and memories and screwed up stuff I went through still effects me today, probably will forever. Music and art helps me vent.

brandonsayyouwill Brandon (bass player for independent pop/rock band Say You Will)
It’s contagiousness. My goal as a musician is to make music that makes others feel the way I’ve felt when I’ve heard a song that I love. I hope someone loves what I do as much as I love what others are doing. That idea; to create a feeling that you’ve felt and loved for some else is very contagious and even biblical.